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Magnetic Resonance An interactive open-access publication of the Groupement AMPERE
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https://doi.org/10.5194/mr-2020-12
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/mr-2020-12
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 27 May 2020

Submitted as: research article | 27 May 2020

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A revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal MR.

Nuclear spin noise tomography in three dimensions

Stephan J. Ginthör1, Judith Schlagnitweit1,a, Matthias Bechmann1, and Norbert Müller1,2 Stephan J. Ginthör et al.
  • 1Institute of Organic Chemistry, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Linz, 4040, Austria
  • 2Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice, 37005, Czech Republic
  • acurrently at: Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SE-171 77, Sweden

Abstract. We report three-dimensional spin noise imaging (SNI) of nuclear spin density from spin noise data acquired by Faraday detection. Our approach substantially extends and improves the two-dimensional SNI method for excitation-less magnetic resonance tomography reported earlier. (Müller, N. and Jerschow, A.: Nuclear spin noise imaging, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 103(18), 6790–6792, doi:10.1073/pnas.0601743103, 2006.) This proof of principle was achieved by taking advantage of the particular continuous nature of spin noise acquired in the presence of constant magnitude magnetic field gradients and recent advances in nuclear spin noise spectroscopy acquisition as well as novel processing techniques. In this type of projection-reconstruction based spin noise imaging the trade-off between signal-to-noise ratio (or image contrast) and resolution can be adjusted a posteriori during processing of the original time domain data by iterative image reconstruction in a unique way not possible in conventional rf-pulse dependent MRI. The 3D SNI is demonstrated as a proof of concept on a commercial 700 MHz high resolution NMR spectrometer, using a 3D-printed polymeric phantom immersed in water.

Stephan J. Ginthör et al.

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Stephan J. Ginthör et al.

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Latest update: 11 Jul 2020
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Short summary
For the first time, a three-dimensional map of the distribution of water in a test sample has been obtained from the random radio signal (spin noise) emitted spontaneously by hydrogen nuclei in a magnetic field with varying field gradients. A special variant of a projection-reconstruction algorithm has been developed for noise data, which allows one to adjust the image quality between high-resolution/low-contrast and low-resolution/high-contrast from the same previously recorded spin noise data.
For the first time, a three-dimensional map of the distribution of water in a test sample has...
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