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Magnetic Resonance An interactive open-access publication of the Groupement AMPERE
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/mr-2020-2
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/mr-2020-2
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: communication 01 Apr 2020

Submitted as: communication | 01 Apr 2020

Review status
A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal MR and is expected to appear here in due course.

Highly Stable Magic Angle Spinning Spherical Rotors Lacking Turbine Grooves

Thomas M. Osborn Popp, Alexander Däpp, Chukun Gao, Pin-Hui Chen, Lauren E. Price, Nicholas H. Alaniva, and Alexander B. Barnes Thomas M. Osborn Popp et al.
  • Laboratory for Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland

Abstract. The use of spherical rotors for magic angle spinning offers a number of advantages including improved sample exchange, efficient microwave coupling for dynamic nuclear polarization nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments and, most significantly, high frequency and stable spinning with minimal risk of rotor crash. Here we demonstrate the sim- ple retrofitting of a commercial NMR probe with MAS spheres for solid-state NMR. We analyze a series of turbine groove geometries to investigate the importance of the rotor surface on spinning performance. Of note, rotors lacking any surface modification spin rapidly and stably even without feedback control. The high stability of a spherical rotor about the magic angle is shown to be dependent on its inertia tensor rather than the presence of turbine grooves.

Thomas M. Osborn Popp et al.

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Interactive discussion

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Thomas M. Osborn Popp et al.

Thomas M. Osborn Popp et al.

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Latest update: 04 Jun 2020
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Short summary
We have recently demonstrated the capability to rapidly spin spherical rotors inclined precisely at the magic angle (54.74°) with respect to the external magnetic field used for NMR experiments. In this work, we show that it is possible to spin a spherical rotor without using turbine grooves, and that these rotors are extremely stable as a result of their inherent spherical-ring geometry. These results portend the facile implementation of spherical rotors for solid state NMR experiments.
We have recently demonstrated the capability to rapidly spin spherical rotors inclined precisely...
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