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Magnetic Resonance An interactive open-access publication of the Groupement AMPERE
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/mr-2020-6
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/mr-2020-6
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 23 Mar 2020

Submitted as: research article | 23 Mar 2020

Review status
A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal MR and is expected to appear here in due course.

Multiple solvent signal presaturation in 13C NMR

Marine Canton1,2, Richard Roe2, Stéphane Poigny2, Jean-Hugues Renault1, and Jean-Marc Nuzillard1 Marine Canton et al.
  • 1Université de Reims Champagne Ardenne, CNRS, ICMR UMR 7312, 51097 Reims, France
  • 2Laboratoires Pierre Fabre Dermocosmétique, 3 Avenue Hubert Curien, BP 13562, 31035 Toulouse Cedex, France

Abstract. The analysis by proton-decoupled carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of samples dissolved in solvents presenting strong multiple resonances can be facilitated by the suppression of these resonances by multi–site presaturation. The advantage drawn from this operation is the elimination of the possible artifacts that arise from the solvent signals in non–optimized decoupling conditions. Solvent presaturation was implemented on glycerol, 1,2–propanediol, 1,3–propanediol, 1,2–butanediol, 1,3–butanediol with at least 94 % on–resonance efficiency and a bandwidth of less 5 than 50 Hz measured at 50 % signal intensity decrease. The experimental measurement of the signal suppression bandwidth leads to unexpected selectivity profiles for frequency close resonances. Computer resolution of the Bloch equations during multi–site presaturation provide an insight into the origin of the observed profile perturbations.

Marine Canton et al.

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Marine Canton et al.

Marine Canton et al.

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Latest update: 04 Jul 2020
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Short summary
The cosmetic industry integrates in its products active ingredients of vegetal origin. For this purpose, plant extracts are prepared and their content must be characterized to check their conformity with safety regulations. Many plant extracts contain a high proportion of high-boiling point solvents that may conflict with analytical protocols. Extract analysis by fractionation and subsequent 13C NMR analysis required a new solvent signal suppression technique to provide better analytical data.
The cosmetic industry integrates in its products active ingredients of vegetal origin. For this...
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